Real Estate Sellers

Vaccines, Stimulus Are Fueling Seller Optimism

Americans are more upbeat about the idea of selling, particularly as the vaccine rollout continues and latest round of stimulus checks are distributed. That could come as hopeful news as many markets face severe housing shortages and buyers are increasingly being left with few choices of homes for sale.

Fannie Mae’s Home Purchase Sentiment Index rose by 5.2 points in March to a reading of 81.7. The components on the index that increased the most last month related to home selling and buying, household income, and home prices.

“The significant increase in the HPSI in March reflects consumer optimism toward the housing market and larger economy as vaccinations continue to roll out, a third round of stimulus checks was distributed, and this spring home buying season began—perhaps with even more intensity this year, since 2020’s spring homebuying season was limited by virus-related lockdowns,” says Doug Duncan, Fannie Mae’s senior vice president and chief economist.

The measure over home-selling sentiment moved higher across most consumer segments and reached nearly pre-pandemic levels, Duncan notes. That is “generally indicative of a strong seller’s market,” he notes. “Consumers once again cited high home prices and tight inventory as primary reasons why it’s a good time to sell.”

More Americans also reported it’s a “good time to buy” in the March survey compared to February, likely still being drawn to historically low mortgage rates despite recent upticks. However, that measure on home-buying sentiment still lags behind pre-pandemic levels. The home-buying experience is proving difficult due to rapidly rising home prices and a lack of housing supply, Duncan adds.

Here’s a closer look at indicators from March’s Fannie Mae’s Home Purchase Sentiment Index, reflecting responses from nearly 1,000 consumers over the housing market:

  • 61% of consumers said it’s a good time to sell, up from 55% in February.

  • 53% of consumers said it’s a good time to buy a home, up from 48% in February.

  • 50% of Americans surveyed believe home prices will go up over the next 12 months, up from 47% the month prior.

  • 54% of consumers expect mortgage rates to increase over the next year, up from 47% a month earlier.

  • 82% of Americans say they are not concerned about losing their job over the next 12 months, unchanged from February.

  • 25% of respondents said their household income is significantly higher than it was 12 months ago, up from 17% in February.

 

Source: “Home Purchase Sentiment Index,” Fannie Mae (April 7, 2021)

The Top Green Features Buyers Seek in New Homes

Energy efficiency is on many buyers’ minds when they shop for new-home construction, according to a consumer survey from the National Association of Home Buyers. The NAHB surveyed more than 3,000 home buyers—both recent and prospective—on the features they most desire in their new home.

Many buyers said they’d go with the more sustainable option, such as the use of more durable materials in their home, when presented the option.

When the cost savings of these features are pointed out, they may be even more tempted—and they say they are willing to pay up front to help lower their utility bills. On average, buyers would pay up to $9,292 more for a home in order to save $1,000 annually on utility costs, according to the NAHB’s study.

“We’re doing a lot more in our homes now,” Brandon Bryant, founder of Red Tree Builders, a green home building company in Asheville, N.C., said during February’s virtual 2021 International Builders’ Show. But he added education is key. “We’ve got to teach people how to live in green homes, how these homes operate, and even before we build to let them know what we could do because a lot of times we could do so much more for their life.”

The top eco-friendly components and designs consumers said they desired:

  • Energy Star–rated windows and appliances

  • Efficient lighting that uses less energy than traditional bulbs

  • Energy Star rating for the whole house

Other trending features center around health and wellness, such as zone heating, purified air appliances (like UVC fans), indoor air quality sensors, and connections to the outdoors, the NAHB said.

"There are a wide range of green features that buyers feel are desirable," said Paul Emrath, vice president of surveys and housing policy research at the NAHB. "Energy efficiency, though, tops the list of what they most want."

 

Source: National Association of Home Builders

The Brighter Path Ahead

More inventory and better access to vaccines are welcome news.

Courtesy of Lawrence Yun

The 2020 pandemic-induced recession was unique in terms of the sudden and massive slashing of jobs. It was also the first recession during which overall income grew. No doubt there are families struggling paycheck to paycheck, but due to the massive stimulus packages—including the initial deposit of $1,200 and enhanced unemployment benefits—the financial condition of many families was better in a recession than before the pandemic.

Total income for the country in late 2020 was 4% higher than a year earlier. This was the figure reported just before the second stimulus checks of $600 per person went out in late December. It also does not include wealth accumulation from the record-high stock market or rising home prices. Also not reflected in the totals are the proceeds from mortgage refinances last year or the relief expected from a new stimulus. Still consumers remain cautious, as spending opportunities have been restricted by COVID-19. For the year, consumer spending fell by 2%. And the savings rate consequently rose to twice the pre-pandemic levels.

The situation translates into the potential for a great unleashing of spending in 2021. The positive impact will be increasingly felt as jobs come around. The full effect will be evident once herd immunity is established with the vaccine, likely in autumn. That is to say, 2021 is a growth year that will take us out of the recession.

The housing market continues to shine brightly. The main frustration is for buyers who find themselves outbid during multiple offer situations. More inventory is needed to give buyers more options and lessen the heat.

It's encouraging to see that builders are ramping up production of homes with backyards, which are now at their highest level in 13 years. Activity has been particularly robust in Southern states where land is more plentiful and building regulations are less onerous.

Moreover, with the wider availability of COVID-19 vaccines, homeowners, especially older Americans, who have been more hesitant about strangers visiting their homes, now may be more ready to list. Many seniors own their homes outright and have sizable housing equity for their next home purchase. They may even need to buy a larger place to accommodate more family visitors. After all, in the new economy, remote-work flexibility may mean more days working from grandma’s house.

 

Lawrence Yun, Chief Economist and Senior Vice President of Research at the National Association of REALTORS®


Happy Valentine's Day!

From all of us at Melanson Real Estate

Happy Valentine's Day!

What's Your Home Worth?

We can assist you with your no-cost, personalized, current market analysis!

Our Agents have the knowledge and experience of our service area and are happy to assist you with all your real estate needs.

 

Shhhh! When a Home Is Too Loud

The ability to work from home during the pandemic has been a blessing for many people, but it’s also made some acutely aware of the absence of one element helpful for productivity: quiet.

By Melissa Dittmann Tracey

With many people working or studying remotely, these strategies may help cut down the noise.

Many have taken to barricading themselves in closets or hiding in their cars to insulate themselves from chatty household members or noisy street sounds. Echo-prone open floor plans have exacerbated the problem as family members concurrently try to do their jobs or attend remote school.

Enter acoustic consultants, armed with sound- proof design techniques and technology to bring some peace and quiet to home environments. Real estate pros can benefit from learning about these enhancements, which can be a valuable amenity for resale, especially for a home on a busy street.

“The pandemic has forced people to look at their home’s acoustics very differently,” says Bonnie Schnitta, founder and CEO of SoundSense, an acoustic consulting company based in Wainscott, N.Y.

Since the start of the pandemic, Schnitta’s firm has been fielding more calls from real estate professionals and homeowners about noisy plumbing, loud traffic, and household sounds amplified by open floor plans. During site visits, they’ll calculate precisely how sound reverberates in a space and offer a range of solutions, such as adding sound-absorbing fabric or foam behind wall hangings or underneath rugs. While these fixes aren’t cheap—consultation fees start at $900—many find the results are worth it.

Real estate professionals are getting help for listings with challenging acoustics. For one hard-to-sell home on a noisy street, Schnitta suggested adding a water feature in the front yard swimming pool, which, combined with a barrier, masked the road noise. The home sold two weeks later. “You can rarely completely erase road noise, but there are ways you can mitigate it,” she says.

Noise can impact resale. A 2017 realtor.com® study showed that sellers of homes within a 2-mile radius of an airport tended to see discounted prices of 13.2% compared to similar homes elsewhere in the same ZIP code. Sellers near train tracks saw average discounts of 12.3%, followed by 11.3% for nearby noisy highways.

The luxury Mozaic at Union Station Apartments in downtown Los Angeles addressed street noise issues by teaming with Veneklasen Associates, an acoustics firm, to work on soundproofing. Because 90% of outside noise entering an apartment comes through windows, behind the existing double-pane windows, they installed secondary, noise-mitigating windows that dampen sound vibrations and prevent sound leaks using recording studio-style soundproofing technology.

Window add-ons from Soundproof Windows Inc. cost $790 to $1,070 apiece, while a sliding glass door insert sells for about $1,600.

Noise reduction can be as simple as adding a $50 door seal or as complex as spending $10,000 or more for full-home soundproofing. Here’s a range of recommendations from acoustic consultants:

  • Cover hard surfaces. Hard, highly reflective surfaces are among the worst sound offenders. Use softer materials, such as area rugs with a sound-absorbing pad underneath and fabric-covered furniture, suggests Audimute, an acoustic design consultation firm.

  • Reduce echoes in open spaces. In open floor plans, sound can bounce everywhere. SoundSense and Audimute offer fabric-covered panels to add onto walls for sound absorption. Or try bookcases—even just half-full—against walls to help absorb sounds. Artwork can also be used as a sound barrier. SoundSense makes a Paradise Foam product, which can be tucked behind canvased art to mitigate noise.

  • Seal doors and windows. Soundproofing companies offer acoustic door seal kits that fit snugly around doors or window edges to reduce sound coming through cracks.

  • Add sound-absorbing shades or drapes. Roman shades, using heavy fabric, can help reduce noise, as can cellular shades and plantation shutters. Heavy drapes and curtains—think suede or velvet—are also effective at absorbing outside noise.

  • Go green. In addition to improving air quality, houseplants can help reduce noise. (They’re most beneficial on hard-surface floors.) Consider a tall, potted Norfolk pine in room corners, Schnitta says. Sound will bounce from the wall onto the foliage instead of throughout the room.

“When [buyers] walk into a home and hear an echo, it can be a turnoff,” Schnitta says. In a listing, “there are several inexpensive things you can do: Put in an area rug with a specialized pad. Put a plant in the corner, even if it’s artificial. Add a bookcase. All of this can make a big difference when it comes to sound.”

 

Melissa Dittmann Tracey is a contributing editor for REALTOR® Magazine. 

Lumber Takes a Fall

Builders and home buyers paid the price as supplies dropped, but the outlook for new construction is improving.

Key takeaways:

  • COVID-19 dramatically disrupted the lumber supply chain affecting home building.

  • Lumber prices have been highly volatile since the spring.

  • An uptick in home remodeling has further squeezed the lumber market and contributed to rising prices.

 

By Daniel Bortz

Last spring, the coronavirus pandemic ground several large lumber mills in the U.S. to a halt—and homebuilders suffered the consequences.

Take Jesse Fowler, for example. Fowler, the president of Tellus Design + Build, a full-service general contractor based in Southern California, said in an interview with REALTOR® Magazine in November that lumber prices for his company had “gone through the roof.” “It’s tough on our business because we have to play the middleman and negotiate lumber prices for our clients,” Fowler said. In one instance, he said, a framer charged one of his clients who was building a new home $90,000 over what was originally estimated to compensate for rising lumber costs.

The COVID-19 crisis and the constraints it has put on the nation’s lumber production aren’t the only factors that have jacked up lumber prices. “Our lumber tariffs with Canada are high, and our domestic lumber industry can’t supply everything that we need,” says Robert Dietz, chief economist at the National Association of Home Builders.

In addition, “the wildfires in the West certainly haven’t helped [lumber production],” says Mike Theunissen, co-owner of Howling Hammer Builders, a custom home builder and remodeler based in Mt. Pleasant, Mich., and chairman of the building materials subcommittee at the NAHB.

Dietz says small homebuilders have had a harder time coping with the price hikes. “Larger builders are feeling less of an impact,” he says.

And optimism is on the rise more broadly. After reaching their peak last September, lumber prices began to fall, according to Monthly Composite Prices reports from industry tracker Random Lengths. “What we had was a shock to the supply system at the start of the pandemic, but now that lumber production has ramped back up, lumber prices have gone back down,” says Mark Rasmussen, a forest economist at Mason, Bruce & Girard, a natural-resources consulting firm, during an interview in early November. Yet just a few weeks later, prices were on the rise again, in response to both favorable building conditions in the fall and suppliers stockpiling materials for an expected busy construction year ahead.

Another bright spot for general contractors: “The remodeling business is busy right now, and you don’t need as many materials when remodeling” as you need to build a new home, Theunissen says.

However, with Americans spending a lot more time at home, many people are taking on home improvement projects themselves. As of mid-August, 61% of U.S. homeowners said they’d taken on a home improvement project since March 1, a NerdWallet survey found. Shawn Church, editor of Random Lengths, says the do-it-yourself remodeling boom contributed to rising lumber prices. “The strong DIY activity generated a demand for wood products that left supply and demand in an acute imbalance,” he says. “Wood products prices surged as a result.”

When lumber costs surged, Theunissen says, his company was forced to make some changes. “We started putting escalation clauses into our contracts for lumber,” he says. “For example, a contract might say that if lumber costs rise by more than 10% before our work is performed, then the customer must pay the difference... We hate to invoke escalation clauses, but there’s only so much we can absorb,” he adds. Howling Hammer’s contracts also started allowing for delays in materials delivery. “If it takes an extra four weeks to do a project because materials arrive later than we expected, then that’s just the way it is,” Theunissen says.

The Impact on New-Home Buyers

Of course, rising lumber prices also affect buyers purchasing new homes. Sales prices of new homes have risen sharply over the past year. As of mid-October, higher lumber prices had added $15,800 on average to the price of a new single-family home, Dietz says. According to Census Bureau data, the average sales price of new single-family houses sold in September 2020 was $403,900, up from $384,000 in January.

Homebuilders are grappling with a number of other challenges, Dietz says, most notably labor shortages and tighter mortgage lending requirements for home buyers and homeowners seeking home equity loans or lines of credit.

There’s little evidence that higher prices have kept large numbers of buyers away. Among affluent buyers, the demand for new construction remains high. Hans Wydler, an associate broker at Compass who works with buyers and builders of custom homes in the greater Washington, D.C., area, says, “Buyers [here] don’t care about lumber prices... That’s just not on their radar.”

Some buyers are being priced out, though. “I have a build job going on right now where the cost went up $50K due to the sudden increases in lumber and other building materials,” says Sheila Smith, an agent with RE/MAX Capital City in Boise, Idaho. “Boise is still being flooded with newcomers from bigger metropolitan areas, mostly California. They can afford the higher-priced homes, and our inventory is down 80% from 2019 overall.”

On a national level, housing starts hit a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.53 million last October, up 14.2% from October 2019, according to the Census Bureau. Moreover, homebuilder optimism in November hit its third straight record high, according to the NAHB/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index, which has been tracking homebuilder sentiment for 35 years.

Possible Solutions

Although future lumber prices can be difficult to predict, experts say a couple of actions may be able to curb lumber costs in the U.S. For one, “we need to find ways for the domestic lumber industry to produce more, perhaps through recruiting more workers or through new forest policy,” Dietz says.

Second, the U.S. government must negotiate a better lumber agreement with Canada to address the high lumber tariffs that are currently in place. “That’s been a longstanding issue,” says Dietz, “but I think it can happen sometime in the next two years.”

Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist, sees reason for optimism. “Lumber prices should moderate and decline somewhat in 2021 as a result of more harvesting and a possible reduction in tariffs to foreign products,” he says. “That will help home building and generate local economic growth.”

 

By Daniel Bortz: Daniel is a freelance writer who specializes in writing about personal finance but also covers real estate, home improvement, travel, careers, small business, and even weddings.

How the Pandemic Is Affecting Where Buyers Move

In these turbulent times, one thing is for sure: The COVID-19 pandemic has drastically changed the real estate market. Low inventory and high demand continue to drive up home prices as buyers explore new markets and consider new places to call home that previously may have been off the table.

By Kaycee Miller: Kaycee manages marketing and media relations for Rentec Direct and shares industry news, products, and trends within the community.

Trends have emerged in terms of popular destinations as a result of changes brought on by the pandemic. Here are a few factors that are expected to continue influencing buyers in 2021.

Remote Work: The New Normal

While remote and virtual work was a growing trend prior to COVID-19, now, nearly a quarter of the U.S. population is currently working from home because of the pandemic. Many experts predict a substantial percentage of the workforce will continue to work remotely in some capacity even after life returns to normal, which means buyers are looking in locations that previously wouldn’t have been a viable option.

With buyers no longer tied to locations because of their jobs, they’re more often considering a move based on lifestyle and quality of life. And if the trend of remote work continues at its expected pace, more buyers will be willing to live further away from their jobs, foregoing downtown areas and public transportation options because they no longer have a daily commute. As a result, homes with a dedicated office space and other work-friendly features will grow in demand.

In San Francisco, some tech company are now allowing employees to work remote indefinitely. I know one buyer who’s now considering moving across the country to North Carolina. There’s not only a substantial difference in housing prices compared to the Bay Area, but he will also be able to keep his current salary. As you can imagine, this will have a massive impact on his family’s income and savings—and it’s something he never would have considered pre-pandemic.

High Costs Contributing to Migration

With people spending more time at home than ever before, many are weighing the pros and cons of price per square footage and opting for more space in a rural location as opposed to less space in a highly populated area.

A growing number of city-based buyers are also considering moving to the suburbs for the first time in pursuit of lower housing prices. And many people have been forced to move during the pandemic as a result of income or job loss.

The draw of popular downtown areas will not likely disappear completely. Job opportunities and proximity to restaurants, entertainment, and culture will continue to attract buyers. However, 2020 did result in more homeowners and renters moving to the suburbs, especially areas with a high number of COVID-19 cases.

Prioritizing the Great Outdoors

As Americans seek easy access to outdoor recreation options, there have been major increases in the number of people moving into states like Utah, Oregon, New Mexico, and Idaho this year, perhaps looking for more distance from others.

The changes this year have been so abrupt and drastic that we have no precedent for examining these trends. What we do know, however, is that the pandemic is ongoing and its complete impact on the real estate industry remains to be seen. The trends we are tracking may or may not be permanent, but it’s worth keeping a close eye on population movement, as these metrics will definitely influence what the marketplace will look like in 2021.

 

Thinking About Buying or Selling Your Home?

If you’re looking to buy or sell your home, then look no further!

We’re here to service ALL your real estate needs. Over 30 years of experience, you can trust. We are an extraordinary real estate company located in downtown Wolfeboro in the heart of the Lakes Region.

What's your home worth? One of our real estate experts can assist you with your no-cost, personalized, current market analysis.

Contact us today!

 

 

7 Mistakes That Could Keep You From Selling Your Home This Winter

Selling a house during winter comes with its own unique challenges. Snow, for one, can bury your home's best features. Your normally lush landscaping may look drab and lifeless. And truth be told, all you want to do is cozy up at home rather than welcome buyers through your door.

Still, if you're game to sell during winter, it's essential that you put on your snow pants and put some effort into making your house shine. To help, here are some classic mistakes to avoid once the temperature drops, and why they can make such a difference. Just avoid making these all-too-common winter-selling fumbles in order to get top dollar.

  

By Jamie Wiebe, Realtor.com

Mistake No. 1: Setting down the shovel

You cleared off enough of the driveway for your car, but potential buyers won't be entering through the garage like you do.

"Blazing a path through 3 feet of virgin snow makes a lousy first impression," says John Engel, a Realtor® with Halstead Properties, in New Canaan, CT.

Don't put away your snow shovel until you've cleared a path to your front door. Or save your poor back by hiring a snow removal company to keep your paths walkable.

"Not only does it make it more inviting for buyers, but it avoids potential safety and liability concerns," says Massachusetts Realtor John Ternullo. 

Mistake No. 2: Giving in to the winter blahs

Gray skies and barren trees make winter a particularly depressing time to sell. But you don't have to let your home look as doleful as the weather.

"Pops of color by the entryway, like a seasonal wreath and topiaries, can add some interest to the front entrance as well as make it more inviting," Ternullo says.

And don't wait until buyers schedule showings to add some life: Colorful curb appeal transforms your listing photos from drab to dramatic.

Mistake No. 3: Not scrubbing your windows

Colder temps have robbed your trees of their leaves, leaving your home to look a bit sadder in winter's wake. But that's not the only problem. Those full trees previously shielded your home from direct sunlight. And now that it's pouring in your windows, potential buyers will be able to see everything. 

Scuffs, fingerprints, and streaks are "never more apparent" than in the wintertime, Engel says, so you should make sure you're vigilant about keeping windows clean. Alone, that grime might not be enough to turn off a potential buyer, but it might make them wonder what other details you've missed.

Mistake No. 4: Displaying outdated summer photos

Your Tudor looks particularly glorious in the summer, but if your only listing photos were taken in April, buyers will immediately suspect a problem.

"Nothing says 'old, tired listing' more than the photo you took nine months ago," Engel says. Talk to your Realtor about taking new photos that make your home look festive and seasonal. Feel free to keep older photos in the listing—your buyers might want to know what the home looks like when the gardens are in full bloom—but updated photos will make your listing seem fresh.

Mistake No. 5: Turning down the heat

"Frugality is great, but not when you're trying to sell real estate for top dollar," says Brian Davis, a real estate investor and co-founder of SparkRental.com.

Turn the heat up before you leave for showings, your utility bill be damned. Stick to 68 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit to keep everyone comfy.

"It will make the house feel homier and more welcoming," Davis says. "It also gives the impression that the house is energy-efficient and well-insulated."

Mistake No. 6: Denying access

It's New Year's Eve and a buyer wants to stop by. How dare they! Shouldn't they assume you have a fabulous party to prepare for?

Maybe. But if you want to sell your home in the off-season, the buyer has to come first. You'll need to work with your Realtor to devise a strategy for squeezing in showings, even in between all of winter's holiday events and family gatherings.

"While it may be inconvenient, it's crucial not to deny showings, as that could be a missed opportunity," Ternullo says. "There may be less buyers compared to spring, but winter buyers tend to be serious."

Mistake No. 7: Leaving out your draft stoppers

Your hand-knit draft stopper might look adorable snuggled against your door, but it "sends a clear message to buyers," Davis says. "This house is drafty and loses heat easily."

Not that you should lie. But every home has hidden problems, and it's best to let the buyers make their own assessments and discoveries during the inspection period. Don't leave out little things that could sway their decision.

 

 

Ultimate Fall Indoor Cleaning Checklist

As the days grow shorter, the weather becomes colder and snow is on its way, it's time to begin focusing on the indoor task that you may have been putting off.

 

1. Sweep and Inspect Chimneys and Fireplaces

Tzogia Kappatou/ iStock/ Getty Images Plus

A chimney should be cleaned and inspected yearly. A chimney sweep will help protect your home from accidental fires caused by creosote build-up. If you didn't give your interior fireplace surround a good cleaning at the end of last winter, do it now. Waiting another season will just add to the build-up of soot and make cleaning even more difficult.

Gas logs and fireplaces should also be inspected and cleaned so that they are safe and ready for use.

2. Change Smoke Detector Batteries

Jul Nichols/ E+/ Getty Images

A change of seasons also signals a time to change batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. This is one chore that can mean the difference in life and death and thousands of dollars in repair costs.

3. Clean or Replace HVAC Filters

firemanYU/ E+/ Getty Images

In addition to having an HVAC technician check your heating system, it is important to regularly change the filters in your heating and air conditioning system. Changing or cleaning filters will improve the air quality of your home and reduce the wear and tear on your furnace.

4. Clean and Reverse Ceiling Fans

powershot/ iStock/ Getty Images Plus

If the ceiling fans in your home have been running all summer, it's time to turn them off and clean the fan. Then, look for a small switch to reverse the blades so that the heated air will be redirected in a downward flow to keep you warmer during chilly days.

5. Deep Clean Throughout the House

gilaxia/ iStock/ Getty Images

If you've taken it easy during the summer and only gotten rid of the most visible grime, it's time to do a deeper cleaning including those places that you have been forgetting to clean including your cleaning tools. As you move through the rooms in your home, follow a checklist to make sure everything gets the attention it needs.

6. In the Bedroom

Oktay Ortakcioglu/ E+/ Getty Images

7. Store Summer Clothes and Inspect Winter Wardrobes

I_rinka/ iStock/ Getty Images Plus

While you're cleaning the bedrooms, don't forget your closet and summer clothes. Empty each clothes closet and sort summer clothes before storing them away. Choose clothes that you want to store until next year to be laundered or dry cleaned. The rest should be sold, donated or discarded. 

While the closet is empty, check that no harmful pests that can ruin clothes are lurking by vacuuming it out well.

8. In the Bathroom

Remove Soap Scum in Bathroom. hesh photo / Getty Images

9. In the Living Room

South_agency/ E+/ Getty Images

10. In the Kitchen

Jul Nicholes/ E+/ Getty Images

  • Empty and clean the pantry. Make a list of holiday baking supplies that you will need.

  • Clean the oven and vent hood.

  • Clean the refrigerator and freezer and discard unusable items. Dust and clean the refrigerator coils.

  • Inspect and clean small appliances.