Activities in Wolfeboro

Happy New Year! Welcome 2021!

May the New Year bring you happiness, peace, and prosperity.  It is time to move forward from the past and celebrate a new start. Wishing you a joyous 2021!

Happy New Year from all of us at Melanson Real Estate!

 

Jupiter and Saturn Will Align to Create the First "Christmas Star" in Nearly 800 Years

As 2020 comes to a close, the solar system has decided to grace us with a cosmic Christmas miracle that hasn't been witnessed in nearly 800 years. On Dec. 21 (aka the December or Winter solstice), Jupiter and Saturn will align so closely in the night sky that they'll almost appear to collide from our vantage point here on Earth, creating a radiant point of light often referred to as the "Star of Bethlehem" or the "Christmas Star."

by Chanel Vargas, Dec 2, 2020

"Alignments between these two planets are rather rare, occurring once every 20 years or so, but this conjunction is exceptionally rare because of how close the planets will appear to be to one another," said Patrick Hartigan, an astronomer at Rice University, according to Forbes. "You'd have to go all the way back to just before dawn on March 4, 1226, to see a closer alignment between these objects visible in the night sky."

The event, sometimes referred to as The Great Conjunction, occurs roughly every 19 to 20 years, but this is the closest the planets will line up in the night sky since the Middle Ages. Technically, Saturn will be 10 au (astronomical units) from Earth, and Jupiter will be 5 au away, but they will appear to be less than the diameter of a full moon apart. 

To catch a glimpse of the phenomenon for yourself, make sure you have a clear view to the southwest about 45 minutes after sunset. The planets will be at their closest on Dec. 21, but the "Christmas Star" will be visible from anywhere on Earth for about one hour after sunset in the northern hemisphere for the entire fourth week of December. If you're viewing with a telescope, you may also be able to see Jupiter and Saturn's largest moons orbiting them that week. The next Great Conjunction this close won't happen until March 15, 2080, so be sure to take a peek out your window later this month for a brilliant holiday treat.

Image Source: Getty / Vidmar Fernandes

Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

The iconic holiday parade will be virtual this year. While Thanksgiving will look a lot different this year because of coronavirus, you can still look forward to watching a modified version of Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade with the whole family.

 

Earlier this month, Macy's announced that its iconic parade will be produced as a television-only experience this Turkey Day. So, for the first time ever, it'll shift from a live parade to a pre-recorded event. Macy's teamed up with City of New York to modify the parade. All the details haven't been released yet, but here's everything we know about the 94th annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade so far:

When is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade?

Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade airs on Thanksgiving Day in the United States. This year, the holiday falls on Thursday, November 26. The long-standing tradition started in 1924 when the infamous parade first debuted and it was later televised for the first time in 1946.

What time does the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade start?

Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade will begin at 9 a.m. and end at 12 p.m. in all time zones. Typically, during the three-hour event, bands from across the country, Broadway performers, and musical guests make their way through the 2.5-mile route on Macy’s signature floats—starting at 77th Street and Central Park West before heading south to Herald Square at 34th Street. This year, however, the event will be held and taped around the Herald Square area. Viewers can still expect to see giant character balloons, floats, street performers, and Santa Claus, but the overall number of participants will be reduced by 75 percent. 

How can I watch and live stream the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade?

The Macy's Thanksgiving parade will air nationwide on NBC-TV. Last year, the parade was also available to live stream. So if it follows tradition, you'll be able to stream it through the NBC app—available on iOS and Android.

Looking Back At Incredible Vintage Balloons From The Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

Waking up on Thanksgiving and watching the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is such a lovely tradition for American families.

In 1924, the parade was moved from New Jersey to New York City by Macy’s. Every year after that initial march down to the Herald Square flagship store in midtown Manhattan, the parade has grown and grown into such a fun celebration that marks the beginning of each holiday season.

Folks dress up in colorful costumes, and marching bands play happy songs. But the part of the parade that is most anticipated is the balloons that float above the street. 

Throughout the years there have been so many iconic characters to take balloon form, but the 17 below are some of the earliest and most memorable balloons.

Do you remember seeing any of these balloons float through the parade when they first appeared? What is your favorite character to look out for on Thanksgiving Day?

1. Felix The Cat, 1927

Felix was the first balloon ever in the parade.

2. Happy Dragon, 1927

The second ballon to float through the parade was pretty adorable, don’t you think?

3. Mickey Mouse, 1934

Walt Disney himself helped design the first Mickey balloon ever.

4. Eddie Cantor, 1934

This was the first balloon ever to be modeled after a real person.

5. Happy Hippo, 1940s

This sweet guy must have been a hoot to see floating through the air.

6. Uncle Sam, 1940s

You have to show some patriotism when you hold a parade in the heart of New York City!

7. Santa, 1940

Santa helped get everyone in the Christmas spirit.

8. Pilgrim, 1946

It is the Thanksgiving Day Parade, after all.

9. Macy's Elf, 1947

This happy guy surely brought tons of smiles to paradegoers.

10. Harold The Fireman, 1948

Harold became a recurring character in the parade in many forms, but this was his first ever appearance.

11. Harold The Baseball Player, 1949

Here he is again the next year as a baseball player.

12. Bullwinkle, 1961

Everyone’s favorite cartoon moose made an appearance.

13. Donald Duck, 1962

Who doesn’t love Donald Duck?

14. Underdog, 1965

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Here comes the hero dog to save the day!

15. Superman, 1966

The Man of Steel himself even showed up!

16. Flying Ace Snoopy, 1968

This was the first of seven Snoopy balloons to grace the parade.

17. Kermit The Frog, 1977

The most lovable Muppet as a giant floating balloon? What’s not to like?

All images courtesy Macy’s, Inc.

Labor Day 2020 is especially important in light of COVID-19 pandemic

Labor Day is a federal holiday in the United States celebrated on the first Monday in September to honor and recognize the American labor movement and the works and contributions of laborers to the development and achievements of the United States.

It goes without saying: This Labor Day is unlike any other that we’ve experienced in our lifetimes.

Even though parades are postponed, and large gatherings are not realistic options this year, the importance of this day cannot be emphasized enough.

By Billy Dycus, Guest columnist the Tennessean

For nearly 130 years, Americans have celebrated the many victories and contributions that working families and the labor movement have achieved while taking time to reflect on what still needs to be done. 

This Labor Day is especially resonant. 

2020 has already given us a considerable amount of time to do both of those things. Since March, workers in Tennessee and across the country have been tested like never before.

From the heroes of the United States Postal Service making sure our mail is safely delivered, to grocery store clerks working overtime to ensure we have food to put on our tables, millions of America’s working people have stepped up, risking our lives and livelihoods, to continuously go to work since the onset of COVID-19.

On this Labor Day, we are especially grateful for the countless essential workers who have kept our economy moving throughout the course of the pandemic.

No words or actions will ever be enough to thank you for everything that you’ve done, but please know that your sacrifices have not gone unnoticed or appreciated, especially by those of us in the labor movement.

 

Billy Dycus is the president of the Tennessee AFL-CIO, which represents over 60,000 working people statewide.

 

How to Host a Virtual Kentucky Derby Party This Weekend

Churchill Downs' first spectator-less race.

COURTESY OF COUNTRY LIVING MAGAZINE

Every year since 1946, the first Saturday of May has been dedicated to a beloved horse racing tradition known as The Kentucky Derby. And while the official Run for the Roses was unfortunately rescheduled from its original May date due to the coronavirus, the "first Saturday" tradition will live on this weekend on September 5. This Saturday, fans will be able to tune in to NBC to watch the 146th Kentucky Derby race, which will be held without any spectators at the historic Churchill Downs racetrack in Louisville, Kentucky. If you're used to participating in a little traditional gambling fun, you can even visit KentuckyDerby.com to place virtual bets on the horses you think will run away with this year's top prize. For additional how-to-watch info, head to the Derby's home page.

In the meantime, there's no better way to prep for an epic at-home celebration than with delicious food and drink recipes! From traditional thumbprint cookies and bourbon cocktails to cute craft and decorating ideas (did someone say vintage trophies?), Here are some ways to celebrate one of the most exciting days in horse racing—no matter where you're watching from. Alright, y'all, we're off to the races!

 

1 Bake Up Derby-Inspired Thumbprint Cookies

Featuring bourbon, homemade caramel, melted chocolate, and toasted walnuts, these butter cookies take inspiration from a famed Kentucky pie.

Get the recipe.

2 Serve a Classic Benedictine Spread

Invented by Louisville caterer and tea room-owner Jennie Carter Benedict, this cream cheese-cucumber dip is a century-old Kentucky classic.

Get the recipe.

3 Place Your Bets

This year, 13 horses will participate in the virtual race. For easy betting, give each guest four of their own color of washi tape–covered clothespins. Let them pick favorites by clipping the pins to the tails of paper prize ribbons. Set a per-bet amount (say, $2), and place cash in a trophy; distribute winnings accordingly. Or, this year, bet on who does household chores, like unloading the dishwasher or folding socks!

Get the Template

4 Fill a Trophy with Fresh-Picked Flowers

Pull out your collection of vintage trophies and fill them with blooms cut from your yard.

5 Set Up a Photo Booth

Smile and say “Eddie Arcaro” (one of the winningest jockeys) with a turf-backed photo booth stocked with props like paper prize ribbons, trophies, riding crops, and hats.

6 Whip Up Bourbon Cocktails

Dust off the punch bowl and stir up a Derby cocktail with bourbon, club soda, orange curacao, sweet vermouth, lime juice, and orange bitters. 

Get the recipe.

7 Dress Up Your Drinks

Trace a bow-tie pattern on craft paper; assemble. Cut a strip from color-coordinated paper, and wrap around glass; tape in place. Tape bow to strip, and let the “tie one on” jokes commence.

GET THE TEMPLATE

8 Make a Horseshoe Wreath

Source:  

Looking for Something Fun To Do This Weekend?

29th Annual NH Water Ski Championships

Presented by: Abenaki Water Ski Club
Location: Back Bay
Wolfeboro, NH 03894
Telephone: 603-520-5413
Web: Abenaki Water Ski Club

  

Spectators can easily access viewing of show from along Bridge Falls Path. Stand or bring a chair! Benches, picnic tables and public restrooms available. Unlimited, free parking in Glendon Street Parking Lot.

Slalom  2C,  Trick 2C,  Jump  2C

Both rounds of each event: Slalom then tricks then jump. Boys-girls-women-men 30-32-34-36. Same order for all 3 events.

 

How to Attract Birds to Your Yard (Hint: Don't Just Wing It)

With a little effort, you can build a swanky bird paradise even your fussiest feathered friend will love.

Source: Zillow Feed

While you’re spending time at home, why not find ways to bring the natural world to you? Backyard bird watching is an enjoyable way to experience your local ecosystem up close.

It takes more than a bird feeder to attract a colorful variety of songbirds to your backyard. Think of your feeder as a drive-thru fast-food joint in an unsafe neighborhood: The birds will stop to eat, but they won’t stick around for very long. They want to get home to their comfy nest in an exclusive deciduous broadleaf community, where they can get fancier food anyway.

If you want to see more than bird backsides at a millet buffet, you need to give them all the luxuries they’ve come to expect.

Create a habitat

Birds prefer townhomes to single-level ranch houses. They need perches for preening, thickets for hiding, branches for bickering, wide-open spaces for showing off, and, eventually, a tree cavity where they can nest and paint their nursery a nice robin’s-egg blue.

Give them privacy by planting walls of foliage. Native shrubs, small trees, and even tall grasses and perennials offer the versatility they need to make a quick escape.

Create a ceiling of tall deciduous and evergreen trees at the back of your property, and plant small understory trees between them and your house. Selectively prune lower limbs of shrubs and small trees so you can easily see perching birds from your window. They’ll appreciate the perch, and you’ll appreciate the camera angle.

Grow your own birdseed

Money doesn’t grow on trees, but, conveniently enough, birdseed does! It also grows on shrubs, perennials, grasses, annuals and anything else that qualifies as a plant.

To grow the seed that your local bird species prefer, however, choose the native plants that they’d otherwise find in the wild. Native plants vary by region, but some good choices include coneflower, blanketflower, beautyberry, asters and sunflowers.

Attract hummingbirds with nectar-filled trumpet honeysuckle and cardinal flowers. Native oaks, hollies, dogwoods, sumac, cedars and spruces provide nuts and berries, as well as shelter.

Stage your birdhouse

Research the birds that you’d like to attract, and give them the house that suits their needs. For example, bluebirds like their nesting boxes out in the open, while chickadees like thick leaf cover.

Whichever bird you try to attract, keep that nesting box away from human noise and activity so you’ll never have to witness the heartbreaking sight of abandoned eggs in an empty nest. Also, keep your cat indoors, if possible. Otherwise, you may find birds not only in your backyard but on your front doorstep too.

If birds haven’t moved in yet, be patient. Sometimes all your birdhouse needs is a little lichen, moss, or wear and tear to make it more appealing.

Turn a birdbath into a Jacuzzi

If your birdbath is emptier than a swimming pool in January, there could be a reason. The ideal birdbath doesn’t look like you’d expect — it’s placed directly on the ground in a shady space with nearby shrubs.

Add some gravel to the basin so birds can find their footing, and even add a few rocks on the outside to serve as steps. Include a small pump or fountain, if possible. This turns your birdbath into a miniature water feature, and the circulation keeps the water clean and helps birds cool off on hot days.

Leave the leaf litter

If you’re looking for an excuse to get out of gardening chores, you’ll be pleased to know that you’re absolutely allowed to keep that accumulation of dead leaves and small branches on your garden’s floor. It gives birds everything they could ever ask for — bugs and other small animals for snacking, materials for nesting, and even a hiding place from predators.

If things begin to look untidy, just break down the larger branches by hand or with a pair of anvil pruners, and spread everything out evenly. Everyone loves free mulch.

Invest in your feeder

Rather than spending money on multiple feeders that you have to replace year after year, invest in a feeder that’s made with quality materials, has a tightly fitting lid, and drains easily. Better yet, purchase a sturdy pole and squirrel baffle.

Even the best feeder will need maintenance, so give it a thorough cleaning every year, and break up any clogged holes so moisture doesn’t accumulate. Trust me on this — cleaning out a maggot-infested feeder is something nobody should have to experience.

 

 

On The Green Arts & Crafts Festival!

The weather looks like it's going to be fantastic this weekend! Looking for something different to do outside?    The Nick is the venue for an arts and crafts fair. Best of all, it's free admission!!!

 

 

On The Green Arts & Crafts Festival

   

When: July 24-26

Where: The Nick, 10 Trotting Track Rd, Rt 28, Wolfeboro

Summer Vacation Arts & Crafts Fair: 10am-5pm, Sun 10-4pm Fine arts, crafts including wood furniture, food music, rain or shine under canopies, masks and social distancing required.  Free admission, Joyce's Craft Fair, held at Nick Recreation Park, More info. call 528-4014, www.joycescraftshows.com

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